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Last Updated: May 12, 2022

State-level momentum for comprehensive privacy bills is at an all-time high. The IAPP Westin Research Center actively tracks the proposed and enacted comprehensive privacy bills from across the United States to help our members stay informed of the changing state privacy landscape. This information is compiled into a map and a detailed chart identifying key provisions in the legislation. Please note these resources only include those bills intended to be comprehensive approaches to governing the use of personal information. Industry, information-specific, or narrowly scoped bills (e.g., data security bills) are not included.

Although many of the proposed bills will fail to become law, comparing the key provisions helps to understand how privacy is developing in the United States. The chart identifies thirteen provisions that commonly appear in comprehensive privacy laws. If a bill includes a provision, an "X" is placed in the corresponding column. The provisions are broken into two categories — consumer rights and business obligations — and are described more fully below.

The Westin Research Center will periodically update this table. If you are aware of a proposed state bill (with formally introduced language) that is absent from our list, please share it with The Westin Research Center, research@iapp.org. The IAPP Resource Center also hosts a "US State Privacy" topic page, which provides a curated collection of news and resources covering US state privacy developments.


Historical Charts and Comparisons
Previous versions of the US State Privacy Legislation Tracker chart are available for 2018-19, 2020 and 2021.

The IAPP also tracks “The Growth of State Privacy Legislation” since 2018, showing the comprehensive privacy bills considered annually by state.

Terms Used in the Chart

The US State Privacy Legislation Tracker chart contains terms regarding the legislative process, consumer rights and business obligations. To better understand these terms and how IAPP is using them in the chart, see below.