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Daily Dashboard | Alberta Privacy Law Ruled Unconstitutional, and More Related reading: IAPP web con: 'Mastering the Cyberinsurance Application Process'

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The Supreme Court of Canada, in a unanimous ruling, has determined that the Alberta privacy law is unconstitutional and has given the province one year to amend it; a federal judge in Vermont has ruled there can be no expectation of privacy when it comes to data exposed online via a peer-to-peer file-sharing network, and the New Zealand Parliament has voted down a bill that would have given the privacy commissioner increased powers. Meanwhile, the U.S. FTC has asserted its power over parental-consent methods; Brazil is calling for a crackdown on government surveillance, and Italy’s data protection authority and intelligence department have entered into a cooperation protocol. This week’s Privacy Tracker roundup has these stories and more. (IAPP member login required.)
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