Oprah Winfrey discusses bringing Rebecca Skloot's novel to life

(Apr 13, 2017) Oprah Winfrey spoke with The New York Times regarding her role in the movie adaptation of Rebecca Skloot’s novel, “The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks.” The novel explores the way Lacks' cells were used for medical research to jumpstart the vaccine industry without the knowledge or consent of Lacks or her family. Winfrey discusses taking on the role, how Skloot was able to bring Lacks’ story to life, and the role race played in Lacks’ story. (Registration may be required to access this story.) ... Read More

Podcast: The IAPP Pubs Team on what you can't miss at this year's Global Privacy Summit

(Apr 7, 2017) Summit is around the corner. In just over a week, more than 3,000 privacy pros from all over the globe will touch down in Washington to talk about the latest trends in privacy, to network and to learn how to do their jobs better. In this episode of the podcast, Angelique Carson, CIPP/US, calls up her colleagues on the publications team back at IAPP headquarters to record a fast and dirty, “Here’s what’s happening at Summit” podcast so you can anticipate what some of the highlights might be, incl... Read More

Op-ed: Increased use of AI could lead to medical data issues

(Mar 31, 2017) In an op-ed for the Ottawa Citizen, Ian Kerr writes about the ethical dilemmas facing health care organizations as artificial intelligence becomes a bigger factor in medical decision making. Artificial intelligence may begin to displace doctors, leading not only to a decrease in human labor, but also in the handling of data. “We stand at the precipice of machine-based medical decision-making that is so complex that neither the machine’s programmers, nor the doctors who use them, are able to full... Read More

How to balance ethics, innovation in the data-driven age

(Mar 14, 2017) The tension between what a company can do and should do with data grows as more opportunities to use information in business-bolstering ways present themselves, creating ethical questions for employers, the Harvard Business Review reports. "We cannot put the big data genie back in the bottle, and we ignore its risks at our peril," the report states, calling the data ethics debate in the technological age "one of the greatest ethical challenges of our time." In order to avoid missteps, companies ... Read More

AI in the workplace, ethical use, and the impact of EU privacy regs

(Mar 14, 2017) The Wall Street Journal reports on the use of artificial intelligence in the workplace and corresponding concerns around fairness, ethical use, and employee privacy. The "biggest caveat," the report notes, is that "AI systems' thirst for data can lead employers to push the boundaries of workers' privacy. It is incumbent upon managers to use them wisely." The report also looks at ways AI is "remaking hiring and managing workers, and some of the benefits and downsides it may bring." Similarly, Mar... Read More

Privacy pros and the ethics of big data tech

(Mar 6, 2017) Last Friday, The New York Times reported on a controversial program created by Uber to allegedly evade law enforcement and regulation of its services. Called "Greyball," the program leveraged information collected by Uber's app with several other techniques to identify potential law enforcement and regulatory officials, including by geofencing offices, scraping publicly available social media posts, and identifying credit card information linked to law enforcement. Though many of these practices... Read More

Is it time for privacy's code of ethics?

(Mar 1, 2017) It’s common for professions to have codes of ethics. Particularly learned professions or those where high expertise is required. Think doctors, lawyers, engineers. But one specialized field noticeably does not have a code of ethics: The privacy profession. There’ve been clamors here and there for a professionalized code, and the "Pokemon Go" phenomenon renewed some of those calls recently. But it’s never gotten up off the ground. Part of the reason for that, insiders say, is the field’s diversit... Read More

Should the privacy profession adopt a code of ethics?

(Feb 28, 2017) It’s common for professions to have codes of ethics. Particularly learned professions or those where high expertise is required. Think doctors, lawyers, engineers. But there is one specialized field that noticeably does not have a code of ethics: The privacy profession. There’ve been clamors here and there for a professionalized code, and the "Pokemon Go" phenomenon renewed some of those calls recently. But it’s never gotten up off the ground. Part of that reason, insiders say, is the field’s d... Read More

When the privacy trade-off is life or death

(Feb 7, 2017) An Ohio man has been indicted on felony charges for aggravated arson for allegedly burning his house down. In its case against him, law enforcement obtained a warrant for all of the electronic data produced by his pacemaker — the data included his heart rate, pacer demand, and cardiac rhythms before, during and after the time of the fire. "Whether he's guilty or not, the case brings to light a difficult tension that will only grow as technology plays a more prominent role in our physical lives,"... Read More

This pacemaker just incriminated its owner

(Feb 7, 2017) In the privacy world, we often talk about trade-offs: the trade-off between privacy and convenience, or privacy and security. But what about privacy and life, itself? What if the technology that helps keep you alive also spies on you? Would you still use it? Is that even fair? Or legal? For some people, this life-and-death trade-off is already a reality. Take the case of Ross Compton, for example. The Middletown, Ohio, resident has been indicted on felony charges for aggravated arson for allege... Read More