Book review: 'The Known Citizen: A History of Privacy in America'

(Jun 26, 2018) The first chapter of Sarah E. Igo's impressive new history of privacy in America begins not as you might guess with Brandeis and Warren's 1890 article in the Harvard Law Review, "The Right to Privacy," but with an 1888 entry from the notebooks of Henry James, in which the novelist deplores the "impudence" of the newspapers of his day that published photos of society swells at their balls and resorts. In Igo's "The Known Citizen: A History of Privacy in America," the choice to begin the story wi... Read More

Book review: 'Privacy’s Blueprint: The Battle to Control the Design of New Technologies'

(May 22, 2018) If the phrase "privacy by design" hadn't already been coined for its special purposes, Woodrow Hartzog might well have taken it as the title of his smart new book instead of the rather oblique title it now bears. In his new book, "Privacy's Blueprint: The Battle to Control the Design of New Technologies," Hartzog, who is on the faculty of the Northeastern University School of Law and a prolific writer for legal journals, addresses design in the usual sense of the term: How things (products, inte... Read More

Book review: 'Privacy and How to Get It Back'

(Apr 24, 2018) "Privacy and How to Get It Back," a short read by B.J. Mendelson, is meant to inform the reader regarding “what’s being done with your data by billion-dollar tech companies” and how the answer to that question exposes a lack of “tools, processes and legislation.” Aimed more at the privacy novice then the privacy expert, the strength of the book is that it is conversational and entertainingly written. It's meant to be a practical guide that examines what users need to know about big data and the... Read More

Podcast: Robocalls, why are they a thing?

(Apr 13, 2018) Robocalls. We've all gotten them. Consumers in the U.S. received approximately 2.5 billion robocalls per month last year. It's the number one complaint the Federal Communications Commission hears, and it's their number one enforcement priority right now. Sometimes, the calls are even scary, claiming you'll be arrested or taken to court if you don't respond immediately. But who are these people making robocalls? Why is it an on-the-rise crime? And if regulatory agencies are struggling to find a f... Read More

The Privacy Advisor Podcast: Robocalls, a series

(Apr 13, 2018) Robocalls. We've all gotten them. Consumers in the U.S. received approximately 2.5 billion robocalls per month last year. It's the number one complaint the Federal Communications Commission hears, and it's their number one enforcement priority right now. Sometimes, the calls are even scary, claiming you'll be arrested or taken to court if you don't respond immediately. But who are these people making robocalls? Why is it an on-the-rise crime? And if regulatory agencies are struggling to find a f... Read More

Making sense of the Facebook-Cambridge Analytica revelations

(Mar 19, 2018) Reaction continues Monday to news that data analytics firm Cambridge Analytica used and allegedly did not delete as agreed what may have been personal information of 50 million Facebook users. The effects of the incident may have far-reaching implications for Facebook and how people view companies' data use policies more broadly. Last Friday evening, Facebook VP & Deputy General Counsel Paul Grewal announced the company was suspending the accounts of Strategic Communication Laboratories, inc... Read More

Harry Potter and the rights of publicity

(Mar 13, 2018) With legal specters still looming from its Pokémon GO app, mobile game developer Niantic is primed to launch a new franchise into augmented reality gaming, "Harry Potter: Wizards Unite." Will Niantic’s acquisition of Evertoon also summon its smoldering right-of-publicity issues? Day Luria, CIPP/E, CIPP/US, looks at the complicated legal issues at play for The Privacy Advisor. Full Story ... Read More

Notes from the IAPP Publications Editor, Feb. 9, 2018

(Feb 9, 2018) Greetings from Portsmouth, New Hampshire! First off, I have to give a shout out to the Philadelphia Eagles on a well-earned victory in the Super Bowl. It has been fun seeing the joy it brought to the city and its fans. I just hope no one got hurt diving off the Ritz-Carlton awning or while hanging out on top of the various streetlights in Center City! Eagles fans are certainly ... unique.  On a more serious note, I was sorry to see that internet pioneer John Perry Barlow passed away this week.... Read More

Book review: 'Lexicon' has some interesting themes, falls a bit flat in the end

(Jan 23, 2018) “Sticks and stones may break my bones, but words will never hurt me.” Within a few pages of reading “Lexicon,” it becomes apparent author Max Barry has a grudge against that phrase, as his novel puts readers in a world where words can hurt, and even kill. Barry’s story follows two separate storylines. Teenager Emily Ruff finds herself being recruited from the streets of San Francisco into a secret society of “poets,” a group of people who use language and word combinations to break through a p... Read More

New art matching app raises privacy concerns

(Jan 17, 2018) The latest version of Google's Arts and Culture app, which has users matching their selfies to works of art from museums worldwide, has some raising concerns about the privacy implications of sending facial information to Google, The Washington Post reports. A spokesman for Google has said the uploaded selfies are used for nothing more than art matches, and the app clarifies the company “will only store your photo for the time it takes to search for matches.” Jeramie Scott, national security cou... Read More