The Privacy Advisor Podcast: How 57 women won a trip to DEFCON

(Sep 7, 2018) Ask anyone who frequents DEFCON, known as a sort of summer camp for hackers, and they'll tell you the attendee roster at the wildly popular white hat event is overwhelmingly male. Rachel Tobac, chair of the board at Women in Security and Privacy, has been going to DEFCON to compete in Social Engineering Capture the Flag for the last three years, and winning. She has gained some notoriety for it, including appearing on this podcast twice before. But noticing she was very much in the minority as a... Read More

Podcast: Product design as an exercise of power and manipulation

(Aug 24, 2018) Our modern privacy frameworks, with their emphasis on gaining informed consent from consumers in order to use their data, are broken models. That's according to Woodrow Hartzog, a law professor at Northeastern University in Boston. In this episode of The Privacy Advisor Podcast, Hartzog discusses the ways that, given such models, technologies are designed at the engineering level to undermine user privacy. Hartzog's research focuses on “the complex problems that arise when personal information i... Read More

Podcast: Edelson on why CaCPA is bad law and suing Kanye West

(Aug 10, 2018) While Jay Edelson is no stranger to taking down big names — The New York Times calls him the "babyface boogeyman" for his takedown of Silicon Valley behemoths, his latest endeavor pushes even him into unchartered waters. In this episode of The Privacy Advisor Podcast, the founder and CEO of Edelson PC talks about his latest legal pursuits, including a class-action lawsuit against Kanye West over alleged consumer privacy violations via his music streaming service, Tidal. Edelson also discusses th... Read More

The Privacy Advisor Podcast: On why CaCPA is bad law and suing Kanye West

(Aug 10, 2018) What we know about attorney Jay Edelson to date: He loves beach volleyball so much that he had a court installed at his Chicago law firm so he and his crew could blow off steam. The New York Times refers to him as Silicon Valley's "baby faced boogeyman" for his aggressive court takedowns of tech behemoths. And he's got a very firm grasp on the global privacy and data protection legislative landscape. In this episode of The Privacy Advisor Podcast, Edelson talks about his latest legal pursuits, i... Read More

Book review: 'The Known Citizen: A History of Privacy in America'

(Jun 26, 2018) The first chapter of Sarah E. Igo's impressive new history of privacy in America begins not as you might guess with Brandeis and Warren's 1890 article in the Harvard Law Review, "The Right to Privacy," but with an 1888 entry from the notebooks of Henry James, in which the novelist deplores the "impudence" of the newspapers of his day that published photos of society swells at their balls and resorts. In Igo's "The Known Citizen: A History of Privacy in America," the choice to begin the story wi... Read More

Book review: 'Privacy’s Blueprint: The Battle to Control the Design of New Technologies'

(May 22, 2018) If the phrase "privacy by design" hadn't already been coined for its special purposes, Woodrow Hartzog might well have taken it as the title of his smart new book instead of the rather oblique title it now bears. In his new book, "Privacy's Blueprint: The Battle to Control the Design of New Technologies," Hartzog, who is on the faculty of the Northeastern University School of Law and a prolific writer for legal journals, addresses design in the usual sense of the term: How things (products, inte... Read More

Book review: 'Privacy and How to Get It Back'

(Apr 24, 2018) "Privacy and How to Get It Back," a short read by B.J. Mendelson, is meant to inform the reader regarding “what’s being done with your data by billion-dollar tech companies” and how the answer to that question exposes a lack of “tools, processes and legislation.” Aimed more at the privacy novice then the privacy expert, the strength of the book is that it is conversational and entertainingly written. It's meant to be a practical guide that examines what users need to know about big data and the... Read More

Podcast: Robocalls, why are they a thing?

(Apr 13, 2018) Robocalls. We've all gotten them. Consumers in the U.S. received approximately 2.5 billion robocalls per month last year. It's the number one complaint the Federal Communications Commission hears, and it's their number one enforcement priority right now. Sometimes, the calls are even scary, claiming you'll be arrested or taken to court if you don't respond immediately. But who are these people making robocalls? Why is it an on-the-rise crime? And if regulatory agencies are struggling to find a f... Read More

The Privacy Advisor Podcast: Robocalls, a series

(Apr 13, 2018) Robocalls. We've all gotten them. Consumers in the U.S. received approximately 2.5 billion robocalls per month last year. It's the number one complaint the Federal Communications Commission hears, and it's their number one enforcement priority right now. Sometimes, the calls are even scary, claiming you'll be arrested or taken to court if you don't respond immediately. But who are these people making robocalls? Why is it an on-the-rise crime? And if regulatory agencies are struggling to find a f... Read More

Making sense of the Facebook-Cambridge Analytica revelations

(Mar 19, 2018) Reaction continues Monday to news that data analytics firm Cambridge Analytica used and allegedly did not delete as agreed what may have been personal information of 50 million Facebook users. The effects of the incident may have far-reaching implications for Facebook and how people view companies' data use policies more broadly. Last Friday evening, Facebook VP & Deputy General Counsel Paul Grewal announced the company was suspending the accounts of Strategic Communication Laboratories, inc... Read More