Notes from the IAPP Editorial Director, April 19, 2019

(Apr 19, 2019) Greetings from Portsmouth, New Hampshire! It was another busy week here at IAPP headquarters as we gear up for our Global Privacy Summit in Washington. This one's shaping up to be ... yes, you guessed it ... our biggest one ever. Hopefully, you've purchased your ticket already, because space is limited, and seats are going quickly. For those who are attending, don't hesitate to say "hi" if you see me. I'd love to connect and hear about what you're up to.  Clearly, we're not the only ones who a... Read More

This week's top-five most-read privacy stories

(Apr 19, 2019) Let's face it, privacy is a busy space right now. Regulations, guidelines, best practice and privacy news are constantly developing. And sometimes, quite frankly, it's hard to keep up with it all. Sure, we try to distill it down for you with our Daily Dashboard and weekly regional newsletters, but we thought it may help to distill things further for you by presenting the top-five most-read stories of the week. So here's our inaugural list for this week, going back to last Friday (to be fair to t... Read More

A look at the EU's study on ethical guidelines for AI

(Apr 19, 2019) "The winds of regulatory oversight for artificial intelligence are blowing in the U.S. and Europe," Redtail Media's Kate Kaye writes. In recent weeks, the European Commission signed off on its Ethical Guidelines for Trustworthy AI, and in the U.S., federal lawmakers, including Sens. Ron Wyden, D-Ore., and Cory Booker, D-N.J., as well as Rep. Yvette Clarke, D-N.Y., proposed new legislation that would require companies to implement automated decision system and privacy impact assessments to their ... Read More

Federal regulators may look at Zuckerberg in Facebook probe

(Apr 19, 2019) The Washington Post reports federal regulators may look at Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg as investigations into the company’s data practices continue. As the U.S. Federal Trade Commission and Facebook continue negotiations to wrap up the agency’s probe as to whether the tech company violated its 2011 Consent Decree in the Cambridge Analytica situation, sources close to the discussion said Zuckerberg could face a level of accountability. Facebook said in a statement it “hope[s] to reach an appropr... Read More

Why employers must watch out for PHI data breaches

(Apr 19, 2019) GovInfoSecurity reports on how data breaches involving health data can impact organizations that fall outside the health care industry. Pointing to Klaussner Furniture Industries, which discovered and reported a health data breach of its Employee Benefits Plan through its sponsor, the article provides best practices to prevent a breach of personal health data for a company's employees and its dependents. CynergisTek Vice President of Compliance Strategies David Holtzman, CIPP/G, explained, "Whil... Read More

Op-ed: More focus is needed to develop de-identification techniques

(Apr 19, 2019) While privacy advocates push for greater data use restrictions, an op-ed for The Hill looks at how doing so could carry a negative consequence for individual patient health outcomes and broader public health goals. The authors write that rather than focusing on imposing greater restrictions for health data, more effort should be placed on developing better de-identification techniques to protect useful data. Using Amazon’s interest and expansion into the health care field, the authors write that... Read More

DHS aims for more airplane facial recognition by 2023

(Apr 19, 2019) The U.S. Department of Homeland Security has laid out a four-year plan to have facial-recognition technology cover 97% of departing airplane passengers, The Hill reports. DHS states in a report U.S. Customs and Border Protection can achieve its 2023 goal through partnerships with airports and airlines and with the expansion of the "Biometric Exit" program that cross-references images of departing passengers with previously stored images from visa and passport applications. While CBP reported the... Read More

Forced smartphone entry up for debate in Indiana

(Apr 19, 2019) The right for the state government to gain entry into a smartphone for law enforcement investigations will be decided by Indiana's Supreme Court, Bloomberg Law reports. Indiana's highest court will hear arguments in Seo v. State, which questions whether the forced entry into a phone violates the right against self-incrimination under the Fifth Amendment. An Indiana lower court found Katelin Seo in contempt after refusing to unlock her phone for authorities, even after law enforcement obtained a ... Read More

The IAPP's top five most-read stories for the week of April 12–18, 2019

(Apr 19, 2019) Let's face it, privacy is a busy space right now. Regulations, guidelines, best practice and privacy news are constantly developing. And sometimes, quite frankly, it's hard to keep up with it all. Sure, we try to distill it down for you with our Daily Dashboard and weekly regional newsletters, but we thought it may help to distill things further for you by presenting the top-five most-read stories of the week. So here's our inaugural list for this week, going back to last Friday (to be fair to t... Read More

EU stresses lawfulness in new ethical AI guidelines

(Apr 19, 2019) The winds of regulatory oversight for artificial intelligence are blowing in the U.S. and Europe. The European Commission signed off on its Ethical Guidelines for Trustworthy AI earlier this month, the culmination of several months of deliberations by a select group of “high-level experts” plucked from industry, academia,  research and government circles. In the advisory realm, the EU guidance joins forthcoming draft guidance on AI from a global body, the Organization for Economic Cooperation an... Read More