Australia examines legality of workplace biometrics

(May 16, 2019) A wrongful termination case in Australia has called into question whether the use of biometrics in the workplace violates the country's Privacy Act, the Society for Human Resource Management reports. An Australian employee was fired for refusing to submit to biometric scanning at work, citing concerns about the collection of his personal information. After being fired for noncompliance and having the Fair Work Commission deny a claim of unfair dismissal, the employee successfully filed an appeal... Read More

Top-five most-read privacy stories since April 26, 2019

(May 10, 2019) Due to the maelstrom of last week's Global Privacy Summit in Washington, the IAPP is showcasing the top-five most-read privacy stories during the last two weeks. The IAPP offers up this top-five list to help distill all the privacy-related content that gets published on a weekly basis. Sure, we try to boil it down each day with the Daily Dashboard and our weekly regional digests, but we know our readers are very busy being privacy pro rock stars. So here are the top-five most-read privacy storie... Read More

Privacy rules on employee monitoring differ between provinces

(May 10, 2019) Lexology reports on Canadian privacy laws that cover tracking employees’ activities. The provinces of Quebec, British Columbia and Alberta have legislation on the collection, use and disclosure of personal information in the private sector; however, Ontario has rules on the use of personal health information in the same area. In order to address the patchwork of laws across Canada, employers are advised to disclose any monitoring activity they conduct, establish their rationale for any form of t... Read More

What should employers do about the CCPA?

(Apr 29, 2019) Despite its name, the California Consumer Privacy Act, which goes into effect Jan. 1, 2020, potentially could impose substantial compliance burdens on and create significant class-action exposure for every employer that employs California residents and has more than $25 million in annual gross revenues. The compliance burdens and class-action risk, however, are not a “sure thing.” This is because the act, as written, might not apply to employers at all, and a pending bill to amend the act and/or... Read More

What should employers do about the CCPA?

(Apr 29, 2019) The California Consumer Privacy Act potentially could impose substantial compliance burdens on and create significant class-action exposure for anyone who employs California residents and has more than $25 million in annual gross revenues. However, these risks aren't a sure thing, because the act (as written) might not apply to employers at all, and a pending bill to amend the act could establish that the CCPA does not apply to employers’ own human resources data. This uncertainty creates a peri... Read More

Study: 61% of employees share sensitive info via email

(Apr 29, 2019) Igloo Software’s “2019 State of the Digital Workplace” report finds 61% of employees share sensitive information via email, ZDNet reports. The company polled 2,000 employees at companies with more than 250 staff members for the study. Other findings include 28% of respondents who said they use instant messaging to deliver sensitive or private information and 66% who revealed they use non-approved communication apps in order to avoid tracking.Full Story... Read More

RNC chief responds to NL commissioner's call for privacy changes

(Apr 26, 2019) In response to a report from the Office of the Information and Privacy Commissioner of Newfoundland and Labrador, Royal Newfoundland Constabulary Chief Joe Boland said the agency is dedicated to the protection of privacy, The Telegram reports. Newfoundland and Labrador Information and Privacy Commissioner Victoria Woodworth-Lynas, CIPP/C, called for the RNC to change its privacy policies in response to an incident when an officer breached the personal and medical information of one of their coll... Read More

The complexity between wellness programs and privacy

(Apr 23, 2019) Consumer Reports looks at the intersection of privacy laws and wellness programs. World Privacy Forum Executive Director Pam Dixon described the relationship between the two as “complex,” as there are “so many different kinds of wellness programs and different [privacy] laws for different ones.” A sponsored bill in California would prohibit employers from making participation in wellness programs a requirement, as well as limiting personal information that can be collected. “If workers choose to... Read More

Employers continue efforts to monitor staff in the workplace

(Apr 16, 2019) CNBC reports on the continued rise of employers monitoring their staff in the workplace and whether privacy laws offer any protection from the practices. A 2018 Gartner study found 22% of companies around the world use employee-movement data, 17% monitor work-computer use, and 16% examine Microsoft Outlook and calendar data. Amazon recently received a patent to detect warehouse workers’ location, while Walmart patented a system to listen in on their employees and customers. “Employees are in a d... Read More

DHS warns of potential enterprise VPN hacking

(Apr 15, 2019) The U.S. Department of Homeland Security's Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency has warned four enterprise virtual private network app providers of system vulnerabilities, Fortune reports. The agency and the CERT Coordination Center, a nonprofit internet emergency response team, issued an advisory to Cisco, Palo Alto Networks, Pulse Secure and F5 Networks regarding the incorrect storage of cookies by each VPN app, which hackers could use to access a person's private computer. Rather ... Read More