ACI_Q2_Ads_successful-728x90
ACI_Q2_Ads_disaster-728x90
ACI_Q2_Ads_battletested-728x90
GDPRNY
Webcon_BB_300x250_ad_4.25.16-01
APF16_Banner_300x250-COPY

(May 2, 2016) The tech world is grappling with new reports that the so-called inventor of Bitcoin has finally been identified. An Australian national, Craig Wright told BBC News that he is the man previously known as Satoshi Nakamoto — an anonymous figure tech writers have been trying to identify for years. And though Bitcoin, and blockchain — the innovation that makes Bitcoin possible — is revolutionizing the financial world, it may have other practical and privacy-enhancing capabilities for other sectors as well. In this post for Privacy Tech, Anonos CEO Gary LaFever discusses how blockchain technology, when combined with other privacy-enhancing technology, can help protect sensitive health information while allowing for needed data flows for health care, research and more. Read More

Daily Dashboard

Roundup: Brazil, Germany, EU, US and more

(May 2, 2016) In this week’s Privacy Tracker legislative roundup, read about a request from Germany’s commissioners for the federal legislator to offer DPAs an independent right of action against European Commission adequacy decisions. In Brazil, privacy advocates are concerned about a vote on seven cyber crime proposals that is expected this week. The U.S. House unanimously passed the Email Privacy Act, putting pressure on the Senate to address the issue; the Supreme Court ruled that judges can approve warrants for accessing computers outside their jurisdictions; and the House Energy and Commerce Committee passed a bill levying heavy punishments for “swatting.” Plus, Colorado’s student privacy bill has received unanimous support from the state Senate and Louisiana and New Hampshire are moving forward on drone bills. (IAPP member login required.) Read More

Daily Dashboard

Did SCOTUS just derail Privacy Shield?

(May 2, 2016) Last week, the Supreme Court updated Rule 41, allowing federal judges to issue warrants for computers outside of their jurisdiction. The move broadens the ability of U.S. law enforcement, notably the FBI, to hack computers outside of the U.S. According to Fast Company, however, the move could also chill already shaky digital trade relations with the EU. Privacy Shield has built-in assurances from U.S. intelligence that it will only conduct bulk surveillance under certain conditions. In discussin... Read More

Daily Dashboard

FCC will not extend broadband privacy comment period

(May 2, 2016) The Federal Communications Commission will not extend a public comment period as requested by the ad industry, MediaPost reports. The Association of National Advertisers had asked the agency for an additional 60 days. “An extension is not warranted in this instance,” wrote FCC Wireline Competition Bureau Chief Matthew DelNero. “A timely resolution of this proceeding will be beneficial for both consumers and industry alike, providing clarity and certainty going forward, and as such, an extension ... Read More

Daily Dashboard

Gannet to face video privacy lawsuit

(May 2, 2016) A federal appellate court has reinstated a potential class-action lawsuit that claims Gannett may have violated the Video Privacy Protection Act, MediaPost reports. The ruling revives a lawsuit filed by a Massachusetts resident in 2014. The plaintiff claims the Gannett-owned USA Today app violated the VPPA by allegedly transferring personal information of users to Adobe. Transmitted information may have included device identifiers, geolocation data and video viewing history. Gannett has argued t... Read More

Daily Dashboard

Press freedom vs. privacy in Paris attack photo case

(May 2, 2016) The New York Times reports on a case that’s pitting the freedom of the press against the dignity and privacy of an individual. On the night of the Paris attacks in November, Maya Vidon-White — a war photographer — took a photo of a man who had been shot, and later died, outside the Bataclan. The photo was published in a weekly magazine, VSD. After going to press, the Paris prosecutor’s office accused Vidon-White of breaking the Guigou law, which makes publishing photographs of victim... Read More

Daily Dashboard

Schumer wants FTC to investigate billboard tracking

(May 2, 2016) Saying it raises “serious questions about privacy,” Sen. Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., has called on the Federal Trade Commission to investigate Clear Channel Outdoor, a company that manufactures billboard-tracking technology, WGRZ reports. The RADAR technology uses mobile phone data to collect information for advertising. “Your personal cellphone should not become a James Bond-like gadget that’s used against you by some company,” adding, “You should have to give them permission to follow you when you ... Read More

Daily Dashboard

Study reveals post-Snowden surveillance chilling effect

(May 2, 2016) A new study from Oxford University reveals empirical evidence that knowledge of government mass surveillance programs make the public less likely to read articles about surveillance and other related topics online, Motherboard reports. The study analyzed Wikipedia traffic before and after the June 2013 Snowden revelations and found evidence of “chilling effects.” Traffic on “privacy-sensitive” articles went down after the “exogenous shock” from the initial Snowden coverage. The articles chosen i... Read More

Daily Dashboard

Federal government accepted all 2015 surveillance requests

(May 2, 2016) An as-of-yet unreleased Justice Department report disclosed that the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court received 1,457 communication surveillance warrants from federal law enforcement in 2015, approving all “entirely or in part,” ZDNet reports. While most of the requests were focused on foreigners’ data, one in five of the warrants were concerned with Americans, the report states. Meanwhile, Facebook indicated that 60 percent of its government-initiated data requests from 2015 prohibited th... Read More

Daily Dashboard

Shared Responsibility Committees’ privacy attitudes called into question

(May 2, 2016) Rep. Bennie Thompson, D-Miss., requested the Privacy and Civil Liberties Oversight Board to examine the Shared Responsibility Committees to ensure they don’t violate civilian privacy, The Hill reports. These groups exist to create “voluntary collaborations between law enforcement and community leaders,” but Thompson argues they are poorly defined and disclosed boundaries could lead to privacy breaches. “Referrals to the committee do not end or preclude the FBI from conducting concurrent criminal investigations,” he said in an April 29 letter to the PCLOB’s David Medine, who recently resigned. “Moreover, intervention leaders are not protected from becoming a part of ongoing investigations and future criminal and judicial proceedings.” Read More

Daily Dashboard