ACI_Q2_Ads_battletested-728x90
ACI_Q2_Ads_disaster-728x90
ACI_Q2_Ads_successful-728x90
PPS15-DC_Web_300x250_CareerCentral_FINAL
Certification_Ad_300x250final-01

(Aug 27, 2015) The government “has failed to conduct proper privacy impact assessments (PIAs) on almost 90 per cent of the national security measures it has passed in the last 14 years,” ABC News reports. That’s according to independent research by privacy advocate Roger Clarke, the report states, noting that since the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks, “Australia has passed about 72 security-related measures—from increasing electronic spying, to metadata and biometrics,” but “only 20 of those laws had any kind of PIA, and of those, half were done in secret without any public consultation,” Clarke said, “The track record of government agencies is appalling on this matter.” Read More

Asia-Pacific Dashboard Digest

A Look at the Latest PIPA Amendment

(Aug 27, 2015) ReedSmith’s Technology Law Dispatch report examines the latest amendment to the Personal Information Protection Act (PIPA). “As a result of the amendment, organisations that experience a data breach could find themselves faced with court-awarded damages of up to three times the actual damage caused” by the breach, the report states. Once the amendment goes into effect, it is expected it “will lead to a sharp increase in liability lawsuits following personal data breaches. With some organisations... Read More

Asia-Pacific Dashboard Digest

JPS Needs Cybersecurity Updates Post-Hack

(Aug 27, 2015) The Japan Pension Service’s (JPS) handing of a May targeted attack that affected 1.25 million records illustrates a “sloppy information management (that) must be corrected urgently,” The Japan Times reports. “A sweeping organizational reform is called for, in addition to the bolstering of information management systems,” the report continues, noting a similar attack occurred in April. The report calls for efforts “to ensure that a recurrence of similar incidents is robustly prevented” and to restore confidence in the JPS. Cybersecurity reform is especially important, the report states, as cyber-attacks “are becoming more ingenious and shrewd.” Read More

Asia-Pacific Dashboard Digest

15,000 Suspected Cybercriminals Arrested

(Aug 27, 2015) In an attempt at “cleaning up the Internet,” the Chinese government arrested 15,000 alleged cybercriminals, PYMNTS reports. “The Chinese have gotten increasingly worried that they do not have the right kind of regulations, protections and responses in place,” said the Council on Foreign Relations’ Adam Segal. “There is a real sense that there needed to be some type of regulatory response to potential attacks.” The move is among other recent Chinese gestures in an attempt to drum up a greater privacy presence, including the announcement of “cyberpolice units” installed at major corporations and a data protection draft law. Read More

Asia-Pacific Dashboard Digest

PDPC Offers Workplace Tips

(Aug 27, 2015) The Personal Data Protection Commission (PDPC) has published its “Workplace Tips on Personal Data Protection” in DPO Connect. "Controls also have to be put in place to make sure that only authorised personnel have access to personal data," the PDPC’s report states, noting organizations should also protect users’ passwords by requiring they be changed, limiting the number of failed login attempts that are allowed before the account is locked and hiding password characters. The PDPC also “advocates for weaving the awareness of personal data protection into the fabric of organisational culture,” the report states. Read More

Asia-Pacific Dashboard Digest

Police, Satellite Tracking Planned

(Aug 27, 2015) By 2018, the Road Transport Department plans to apply a Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) device to vehicles across Malaysia, Paultan.org reports. The aim of the RFID is to “allow real-time monitoring of traffic conditions and help police track down criminals,” the report states. “While this may raise privacy concerns … the use of RFID tech will herald a new era for vehicle security … and could be the answer to combat vehicle theft and cloned vehicle syndicates,” said Deputy Transport Minister Datuk Aziz Kaprawi. A “smart code” feature permits vehicle tracking by the authorities and satellites. Read More

Asia-Pacific Dashboard Digest

Australian Government to Debut Facial Recognition Database

(Aug 27, 2015) By next year, the Australian government expects to have a plan in place for law-enforcement agencies to share facial-recognition data, according to IT News. As they try to battle organized crime, the report says, law-enforcement officials have been working on a national facial recognition database, which will initially be focused on matching faces to known criminals and then expand to match the faces of unknown criminals in footage or images to those in the general population via images collected for identity documents. The government currently holds some 100 million such images. At least six federal agencies will be able to access the database when it goes live. Read More

Asia-Pacific Dashboard Digest

Portable Fingerprint Devices on NSW’s Horizon

(Aug 27, 2015) New South Wales (NSW) police are on the lookout for portable fingerprint scanners that are compatible with Samsung Note 4, a move that MobileIDWorld predicts will cause minimal privacy waves. The search for the scanners was catalyzed by the police department’s desire to streamline the identity-check process, the report states, noting that while “there has also been strenuous ongoing debate in the country about associated privacy and civil rights issues … the NSW Police efforts in this case are fairly incremental … and are unlikely to spark a major controversy, at least until the police actually start using fingerprint sensors in the field.” Read More

Asia-Pacific Dashboard Digest

Would a Law Degree Take Your Privacy Career to the Next Level?

(Aug 27, 2015) The IAPP Privacy List recently lit up a bit when a member posed this question: Should I go get a law degree? It was a legit question; the IAPP 2015 Salary Survey found that after C-suite or VP-level positions, lead counsel had the highest median salaries among privacy pros. But getting a law degree isn't a small feat. There's studying for the LSATs; praying to some God you get in; three years of nail-biting through papers and exams, and then, and THEN, the bar. Oh, and all that debt. So is all that worth it? Will it mean a straight line to privacy pro success? This exclusive for The Privacy Advisor aims to answer that question—and commenters are already adding to the dialogue at the finish of the piece. Read More

Asia-Pacific Dashboard Digest, Canada Dashboard Digest, Daily Dashboard, Europe Data Protection Digest

Don’t Blow Data Protection, CIOs, or You’ll Get Sued

(Aug 27, 2015) CIOs and CISOs beware—data mismanagement at your company could land you in hot water, Bloomberg BNA reports, citing Donna Seymour, CIO of the U.S. Office of Personnel Management (OPM) and her inclusion in an OPM lawsuit as precedent for the treatment of CIOs after a breach. “More and more, CIOs and CISOs will be personally accused for their actions, and inactions, prior to and during, cyber-events, and personally named as parties in lawsuits,” the report continues. “It will be argued that the CIO and/or CISO, by dint of their role and purported expertise, assume a fiduciary duty to the shareholders and to those whose information they are supposed to protect, requiring the installation, monitoring and modification/updating of appropriate cybersecurity measures.” Read More

Asia-Pacific Dashboard Digest, Canada Dashboard Digest, Daily Dashboard, Europe Data Protection Digest