Sens. unveil bill to limit federal law enforcement's facial-recognition use

(Nov 15, 2019) U.S. Sens. Chris Coons, D-Del., and Mike Lee, R-Utah, have introduced the Facial Recognition Technology Warrant Act, which seeks to cut the use of facial-recognition software by law enforcement agencies, CNET reports. The bill would require the Federal Bureau of Investigation, Immigration and Customs Enforcement and other agencies to obtain warrants for surveillance activities that use facial recognition. The law would also place limits on data collection from facial-recognition use. "This bipar... Read More

It’s 2019, so why are we still talking about opt-in consent?

(Nov 12, 2019) Once again, legislators are touting their opt-in consent bills as the revolutionary solution to all our privacy woes. Once again, they could not be more wrong. At a time when even our toasters are online, opt-in consent is a horse in a self-driving car world.   State Rep. David Santiago, R-Fla., announced in September 2019 that he is introducing a privacy bill that calls for opt-in consent because the “basic framework should always start with the opt-in option. All too often, and somewhere in s... Read More

Privacy advocates speak against Canada's 'Textalyzer' for drivers

(Nov 8, 2019) CTV News reports Canada's plans for a "Textalyzer," which will monitor the efforts of texting while driving, is facing backlash from privacy advocates. While the general purpose of the surveillance is generally welcomed, advocates argue that the technology may provide police with personal data that would typically require a warrant to obtain. “My concern is this: if the police are accessing your cellphone, could they get access to any other information ... all of the sensitive data?" former Info... Read More

US Senate hears arguments on whether to reauthorize surveillance provisions

(Nov 7, 2019) At a U.S. Senate Committee on the Judiciary hearing Wednesday, lawmakers asked members of the intelligence community, academics and the chairman of the Privacy and Civil Liberties Oversight Board whether it should reauthorize provisions of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act in the name of thwarting terrorism. Without Congressional re-approval, the surveillance powers discussed will expire at the end of this year. Briefly: The "roving wiretap, business records and lone wolf provisions" we... Read More

Taiwan Railways Administration excludes facial recognition from surveillance trial

(Nov 7, 2019) FocusTaiwan reports the Taiwan Railways Administration has announced its surveillance system trial will not include facial recognition. The system has facial-recognition cameras, but they will be disabled after public privacy concerns were raised. The artificial intelligence–based surveillance will still be capable of monitoring passenger behavior, including trespassing, loitering in restricted areas and prohibited acts.Full Story... Read More

Sens. grill government on whether to renew surveillance powers

(Nov 7, 2019) At a U.S. Senate Committee on the Judiciary hearing Wednesday, lawmakers asked members of the intelligence community, academics and the chairman of the Privacy and Civil Liberties Oversight Board whether it should reauthorize provisions of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act. Without Congressional re-approval, the surveillance powers discussed will expire at the end of this year. Government agencies urged Congress to reauthorize, permanently, each of the crime-fighting tools "based not onl... Read More

The Privacy Shield review and its potential to impact Schrems II

(Nov 5, 2019) Though the headline announcing the European Commission’s report on the third annual review of the EU-U.S. Privacy Shield was banal, several paragraphs within the report were anything but. In its report and accompanying staff working document, the European Commission cited one “clarification” and three court cases with the potential to influence the outcome of the Schrems II case currently pending before the Court of Justice of the European Union. These commission findings relate to the independ... Read More

On the Privacy Shield review's potential to impact 'Schrems II'

(Nov 5, 2019) Last month the European Commission released its report on the third annual review of the EU-U.S. Privacy Shield, and though the news was good for U.S. businesses, the future of data transfers between the two regions remains uncertain. The Court of Justice of the European Union is set to hand down in the coming months its decision to the so-called "Schrems II" case involving the legality of standard contractual clauses. "Though the headline announcing the European Commission’s report on the third... Read More

Senate committee to hold hearing on USA Freedom Act renewal

(Nov 5, 2019) The U.S. Senate Committee on the Judiciary will hear arguments Wednesday regarding the reauthorization of the USA Freedom Act. Renewing the law would include reauthorizing the provisions of Section 215, which allow the National Security Agency access to Americans' phone records as part of terrorism investigations. The Senate hearing will feature two panels of national security officials and professionals, including Privacy and Civil Liberties Oversight Board Chairman Adam Klein.Full Story... Read More

Podcast: Debrief on legislative action in Brussels

(Nov 1, 2019) It wasn't long ago that the number of journalists covering the privacy and data protection beat was very small. Most mainstream newspapers didn't have a journalist dedicated to what were once considered very niche topics. Now, every major newspaper has one or more journalists dedicated to the onslaught of daily news made by tech companies' missteps or the policymakers reacting to them. In this episode of The Privacy Advisor Podcast, host Angelique Carson, CIPP/US, chats with Brussels-based Polit... Read More