U.S. National Security Agency Director General Keith B. Alexander has said the unauthorized disclosures by Edward Snowden—who will speak via videoconference at South by Southwest—have stymied efforts by the government to prevent cyber-attacks on major U.S. infrastructure, The New York Times reports. In one of his last public speeches before departing the agency, Alexander predicted that Congress would change laws around the bulk collection of telephone records before passing cybersecurity legislation that could help the government work with private companies in sharing threat data. Alexander has asked for laws that would clear the way for companies to share data with the government about incoming threats—something, he said, that is often prevented by current privacy law, the report states. In a separate but related story, the federal government has filed a lawsuit against Sprint, accusing the company of overcharging federal agencies for wiretapping services, an act, they argue, that violates the Communications Assistance in Law Enforcement Act of 1994. (Registration may be required to access this story.)
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